The Roxy Letters by Mary Pauline Lowry

Genre: Contemporary Fiction

My Rating: ⭐⭐⭐ 1/2 (3.5 stars)

“Yeah. I’m pretty sure ‘trophy wife’ is a top-five fetish for underemployed artist types.” -Crumb Cake (Artemis)

It wasn’t perfect, but I had a blast reading this one. Roxy is like the friend you live vicariously through, who has all the crazy adventures and messed up stories to tell.

I read this book in short doses, which is probably the way to go, since the entire book is written in the form of letters to Everett (the ex-boyfriend turned roommate). This will either work for you or it won’t.

For me, it was lacking some pizzazz. It would have been a knockout had the book included Everett’s response to some of the letters, with perhaps a mix of text messages between some of the characters.

Unfortunately, I did not see the connection between this story and Where’d You Go Burnadette, other than the topic of mental illness. So I have no idea why that was even a comparison.

While I enjoyed the happy ending, I also thought it was rushed and wrapped up too neatly.

Don’t get me wrong. This was an overall fun read, and exactly the break I needed from my usual reads.

If you:

✔ enjoyed Bridget Jones

✔ like happy endings

✔ aren’t a prude

✔ enjoy epistolary format

Then I think you’ll wanna read this one. 🙂

Have you read it? What did you think?

Bridget Jones penned a diary; Roxy writes letters. Specifically: she writes letters to her hapless, rent-avoidant ex-boyfriend—and current roommate—Everett. This charming and funny twenty-something is under-employed (and under-romanced), and she’s decidedly fed up with the indignities she endures as a deli maid at Whole Foods (the original), and the dismaying speed at which her beloved Austin is becoming corporatized. When a new Lululemon pops up at the intersection of Sixth and Lamar where the old Waterloo Video used to be, Roxy can stay silent no longer.

As her letters to Everett become less about overdue rent and more about the state of her life, Roxy realizes she’s ready to be the heroine of her own story. She decides to team up with her two best friends to save Austin—and rescue Roxy’s love life—in whatever way they can. But can this spunky, unforgettable millennial keep Austin weird, avoid arrest, and find romance—and even creative inspiration—in the process?

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